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Wen-Shing Ho

Wen-Shing Ho

Dr. Wen-Shing Ho is a filmmaker, writer and academic. Her experiences with multidisciplinary art works (Film, Music, and Dance) have allowed her to cultivate an interest in oriental aesthetics; and Dr. Ho’ films have garnered acclaim through screenings at most prestigious film festivals and at venues such as the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. and Singapore National Gallery Theater. According to the VARIETY, Dr. Ho’s film “TAKAO DANCER offers a refreshingly playful break from cinematic storytelling conventions.” Dr. Ho’s dissertation “Musical Composition Techniques of Maurice Ravel and Toru Takemitsu to the Conception and Direction of Digital Cinema” was officially selected by peer reviewed LABS Abstract Leonardo database, 2016. Her writing “Tear Love Smile” was officially selected at Torino Script and Pitch workshop with project merit scholarship in Italy, 2010 and her short story “Rag and Bone” was published in The Louisville Review and nominated for Pushcart Prize in 2020.


Dr. Ho received the Doctor of Science from Global Information and Telecommunication Studies at Waseda University in Tokyo Japan, the graduate credits in Film Music at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University and a Master of Fine Arts in Film and Electronic Media at School of Communications, American University in Washington, DC. Dr. Ho was assistant professor at the Department of Performing and Fine Arts, DeSales University, USA (2001-2004); the pioneer scholar for the School of Art, Design and Media at Nanyang Technological University Singapore (2005-2010); associate researcher at Waseda University Tokyo Japan (2013-2014). She acted as a visiting professor/artist, most notably at University of Oregon, NYU Tisch Asia, Shanghai Conservatory of Music. Currently, Dr. Ho is tenured associate professor at University of Southern California and Shanghai Jiao Tong University joint Institute of Cultural and Creative Industry in Shanghai, China.

Anjana Menon

Anjana Menon

Anjana Menon has been wrestling with words for as long as she can

remember. After doing her Master’s in English Literature, she got sucked

into a journalism career that took her to Southeast Asia and Europe with

Bloomberg News.


She returned to India as one of the founder-editors of the business

newspaper Mint and then ran a national television channel before setting

up her own content strategy consultancy. She has written two books, and

published with both Penguin Random House and HarperCollins.

She is a co-author of What's Your Story? The Essential Business

Storytelling Handbook published by Penguin Random House. It was a

category bestseller for several months.


Her second book, Onam in a Nightie: Stories from a Kerala Quarantine, was

the bestseller on The New Indian Express books list, a must read on

Scroll.com’s list, and category bestseller on Amazon.in, in the travel and

humour sections. Her writing has been compared to RK Narayan and

William Faulkner by critics.


She is a columnist for several business publications including The

Economic Times, Moneycontrol.com, Business Standard among others.

She likes people more than gadgets, dogs even more than people and slow

life over hurried living.


A British national, Anjana divides her time between Delhi and London.

Onam in a Nightie is her debut narrative non-fiction book.

She can be found digitally on @menonanj.

Anica Liu

Anica Liu

Anica Liu was born in China and settled in Singapore since 2008.


Before she started to write short stories in 2014, she wrote popular science, as her major was biology and ecology in college. She is a multiple-time winner of Golden Point Award by National Arts Council of Singapore (2015, 2017 and 2019), and was on the longlist of Commonwealth Short Story Prize (2018 and 2020). She was also a reviewer of local theatre in 2017. Her stories were published in People’s Literature, Zhongshan, and Lianhezaobao.


For her, arts and literature shed light on the monumental and personal chapters in history, as well as the ambiguity of human nature

Belinda Chang

Belinda Chang

Belinda Chang, pen name Chang Yuan, was born in Taiwan in 1963. She graduated from the Department of Chinese Literature at National Taiwan University, and earned a masters degree from the department of Performance Studies at New York University. She worked as a journalist for the iconic cultural magazine “ECHO” in Taiwan, and for the largest Chinese newspaper, World Journal, in New York.


In the mid-90s, she won several major literary awards in Taiwan, published her first short story collection, and established herself as a unique voice among Taiwanese writers. She has since published eight collections of short stories, two novels, one collection of essays. Three collections of selected stories have been published since 2016. Chang’s works have been included in various literary anthologies, taught in colleges, and translated into English.


Since 2005, she and her family have been living in Shanghai, China. The experience of living in various countries and cultures has given Chang’s work its characteristic complexity and depth. Her works were praised as having captured vivid images of Taiwanese immigrants/residents in the USA as well as mainland China.


She has been a participant in the conference since 2010.

Malachi Edwin Vethamani

Malachi Edwin Vethamani

Malachi Edwin Vethamani is a poet, writer, editor, critic, bibliographer and academic.  His publications include: Coitus Interruptus and Other Stories (2018), two collections of poems Complicated Lives (2016) and Life Happens (2017). His latest publication is an edited volume of Malaysian poems by emerging Malaysian poets entitled, Malaysian Millennial Voices (2021). He has also edited two volumes of Malaysian writings which cover a period of over 60 years, Malchin Testament: Malaysian Poems (2018) and Ronggeng-Ronggeng: Malaysian Short Stories (Maya Press, 2020). His publication Malchin Testament: Malaysian Poems won the Malaysian Book Award 2020 for the English Language category.


His poem ‘Solitude’ from Life Happens was set to music by Malaysian jazz musician Tay Cher Siang and the song premiered in the Malaysian Jazz Festival, sung by Aaron Teoh on Malaysian Jazz Marathon 2020 on 15 November. His poems have appeared in Dhaka Review (2021), Unmasked: Reflections on Virus Time, Singapore, Heliconia Press, (2020), Kitaab.com (2020), Anak Sastera (2020 and 2017), Creative Flight Literary Journal (2020), Business Mirror (2018), Southeast Asian Review of English (2016), Asiatic: Journal of Language of Literature (Kuala Lumpur: 2015), Ghulam Sarwar Yousuf, (ed.) Asian Centre Anthology of Malaysian Poetry in English (Partridge Press, Singapore: 2014) and C.Y. Loh and I.K. Ong. (eds.) SKOOB Pacifica Anthology No. 1: Southeast Asia Writes Back! (London: 1996). A theatrical adaptation of three of his stories from Coitus Interruptus and Other Stories were reworked as monologues and performed as ‘Love Matters’ by Playpen Performing Arts Trust in Mumbai in 2017 and 2018. His short story ‘Best Man’s Kiss was reworked into a short play for an event called ‘Inqueerable’ organized by Queer Ink in Mumbai on 8th September 2019 to celebrate the first anniversary of the Supreme Court of India overturning Article 377 of the Indian Penal Code which had made consensual homosexual sex illegal. His stories have also been published in Queer Southeast Asia Literary Journal (2020), Creative Flight Literary Journal (2020), Business Mirror (2018), and Lakeview International Journal of Literature and Arts (2017).


He is Founding Editor of the recently launched Men Matters Online Journal (December 2020). The second issue will be published in June 2021.


He is Emeritus Professor with the University of Nottingham. He is former Head, School of English and Professor of Modern English Literature at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Nottingham Malaysia.


Website: www.malachiedwinvethamani.com

Journal website: www.menmattersonlinejournal.com

Email: malachi.vethamani@nottingham.edu.my

Billy O'Callaghan

Billy O'Callaghan

Billy O’Callaghan was born in Cork in 1974.


He is the author of four short story collections and two novels, most recently the novel, My Coney Island Baby, which was published in 2019 by Jonathan Cape (and Harper in the U.S.), and translated into eight languages; and a collection, The Boatman, and Other Stories, published by Jonathan Cape (UK) & Harper (US) in 2020.


Winner of the Irish Book Award for Short Story of the Year and a finalist for the Costa Short Story Award, more than 100 of his short stories have appeared in journals such as: Agni, the Chattahoochee Review, the Kenyon Review, Narrative, Ploughshares, Salamander and the Saturday Evening Post.

Billie Travalini

Billie Travalini

Billie Travalini’s work has been published in The Moth, Another Chicago Magazine, Things Left and Found by the Side of the Road, and Lakeview International Journal of Literature and Arts, among others. Her memoir, Blood Sisters, was a finalist for the Bakeless Publication Prize and won the Lewes Clark Discovery Prize. Her edited work includes On the Mason Dixon Line: an Anthology of Contemporary Delaware Writers, No Place Like Here: An Anthology of Southern Delaware Poetry and Prose, and Teaching Trouble Youth: A Practical Pedagogical Guide. She is a recipient of the Governor’s Award for the Arts, Education, the Delaware Division of the Arts, Masters Award in Literature, and the National Federation of Press Women Communicator of Achievement Award, the organization’s highest award. A longtime advocate for at-risk kids and the mentally ill, she is co-founder and coordinator of the Lewes Creative Writers Conference, teaches creative writing at Wilmington University and is busy at work on Rush Limbaugh and the French Apple Pie and Other Stories and Rules to Survive Childhood, a sequel to Blood Sisters.


Bronwyn Lloyd

Bronwyn Lloyd

Bronwyn Lloyd completed a PhD in English at the University of Auckland in 2010. Her first collection of short stories, The Second Location, was published by Titus Books in 2011. She has recently completed a second short story collection, A Slow Alphabet, and a novel, Inanimals United. Bronwyn works as a freelance art writer and curator.

Carmelinda Scian

Carmelinda Scian

Carmelinda Scian obtained a BA and an English MA from the University of Toronto while working and owning her own beauty salon. She ventured into creative-writing about eight years ago. She won the Malahat’s Review, Open Seasons Award  in 2013, was long-listed for The Fiddlehead Short-Fiction contest in 2018, won first prize in the Toronto Star short story contest  (2015), was Runner-up in the University of Toronto Short Story Contest. Her story, “Yellow Watch” was nominated for the 2018 Journey Prize. She had the honor of being Final Judge for the 2018 Malahat Review’s  Open Season Award. She won a scholarship toward the “Writing the Luso Experience” workshop, 2019, and is presently a reader for the Fiddlehead International Literary Journal. Her stories have appeared in Malahat, the Fiddlehead, and Litro, and are forthcoming in Prairie Fire and Belletrist. She has just completed her first collection of related short-stories.

Carmelo Militano 

Carmelo Militano 

Carmelo Militano is an award-winning poet and writer. He is the winner of the F.G.Bressani award for poetry.


Militano’s work includes two books of poetry, Morning After You, and The Stone Mason’s Notebook; the prose works, The Fate of Olives, Sebastinao’s Vine, Lost Aria, and Catching Desire, a reading on the life and art of Amedeo Modigliani.

Catherine Chidgey

Catherine Chidgey

Catherine Chidgey’s novels have been published to international acclaim. Her first, In a Fishbone Church, won Best First Book at the New Zealand Book Awards and at the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Asia-Pacific region). It won a Betty Trask Award in the UK and was longlisted for the Orange Prize. Her second, Golden Deeds, was chosen by Time Out magazine, London, as a book of the year, and was a Notable Book of the Year in The New York Times Book Review and a Best Book in the LA Times Book Review. In 2002 she won the inaugural Prize in Modern Letters, New Zealand’s richest single literary prize, and in 2003 she was named by a Listener panel of writers, critics and booksellers as the best New Zealand novelist under 40. In 2013 she won the BNZ Katherine Mansfield Award – New Zealand’s most prestigious short story prize – and in 2017 her best-selling fourth novel the The Wish Child won the $50,000 fiction prize at the New Zealand book awards. Her short stories have been published in numerous literary journals and widely anthologised, and she has been highly commended in the Bridport Prize, the Australian Book Review Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize and the Moth Short Story Prize. Her ‘found’ novel, The Beat of the Pendulum, was longlisted for the 2018 New Zealand book awards, and her most recent honour is the Janet Frame Fiction Prize. Her sixth novel, Remote Sympathy, is due for international release.


Catherine has held fellowships in New Zealand and internationally, including the Katherine Mansfield Memorial Fellowship to Menton, France. She has been Writer in Residence at the universities of Canterbury, Otago and Waikato. She teaches creative writing at the University of Waikato in Hamilton. In 2019, with funding from Waikato, she initiated and judged the inaugural Sargeson Prize – New Zealand’s richest short story competition.

Chang Ying-Tai 

Chang Ying-Tai 

Chang Ying-Tai is one of Taiwan’s most acclaimed writers. She received her PhD in Literature from National Taiwan University, and holds the position of Distinguished Professor at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei.


Her writing has garnered almost thirty major literary awards, including several of Taiwan’s most prestigious honours for fiction: the China Times Prize (twice); the United Daily Press Prize (three times); the Central Daily News Prize (seven times); the Taiwanese Ministry of Education’s Award for Literary Writing (twice); the Taiwan International Book Fair’s Book of the Year Prize; and the Lennox Robinson Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Arts. She was also a finalist for the Two-Million-Yuan-Award for Novelists, Asian literature’s largest monetary prize.


Chang Ying-Tai has authored three short story collections, and five novels, two of which – The Bear Whispers to Me and As Flowers Bloom and Wither – have been published as English translations in London.